Caitlin Fargher, Sweet Water, 2020, photo: Jessica KingAn Education Resource for Kindergarten to Year 6.

Many contemporary artists are concerned about the toxicity of art materials, such as in some coloured inks and paints, and the hazardous waste of the chemicals needed to clean them up. Instead of using harmful products, they are exploring new kinds of materials and techniques.

In Tasmania, artist Caitlin Fargher uses materials such as toffee, meringue, clay and ice to create sculptural art installations.

“A lot of my process is cooking, and scientific experimentation. I like to use natural / recycled materials as much as possible, and things that aren’t costly to the environment (no plastics unless I reallllllyy have to…) I like to get messy and I like it when the things I’m making smell good, and sometimes taste good too!”

Tasmanian artist Caitlin Fargher

In her exhibition Sweet Water, multidisciplinary installation artist Caitlin Fargher reimagines what Hadley’s was like in the early 1800s when the hotel housed a lush garden and inventive pastry shop – akin to Jacob Kowalski’s fabulous bakery in Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.
In the Leadlight Room, the historic coloured-glass patterns in the ceiling are mirrored in toffee, poised atop a tall, decorative table. Like Alice’s shrinking in Wonderland, it challenges scale and prompts us to look up in awe.

Central to the installation is a three-tiered fountain adorned with hand-sculpted clay tiles glazed with the ash of local fallen trees (teatree and casurina). The clay was collected around Hobart. It represents the unearthing of histories that are swept under the paving, tiles and facades – the colonial history of attempting to tame nature and the dark past of invasion. The trickling sounds of the fountain evoke the Hobart rivulet which frequently flooded Hobart Town. From the muddy streets outside, stepping into Hadley’s Orient Hotel was a sweet oasis.

With its raw and sweet materials, this art installation speaks of Hobart’s past while also representing hope for a sustainable and engaged future, a paradise to be.

Download the Educaton Resources as a PDF.

Hadley Art Prize Hobart 2019 cataloguePresented by Hadley’s Orient Hotel, the Hadley’s Art Prize, Hobart is an annual, acquisitive Australian landscape prize, which offers $100,000 to the winning entry. Dating back to 1834, Hadley’s Orient Hotel has a rich and fascinating history interwoven with art, particularly landscape art.

The Hadley’s Art Prize, Hobart seeks to contribute to the Tasmanian and Australian art scene, generating interest in cultural tourism and promoting the work of contemporary Australian landscape artists.

Judged by a panel of art specialists, the prize is open to Australian artists over the age of eighteen working in two-dimensional media. Artists at all career stages are invited to enter. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists are encouraged to enter.

Find out more about Hadley's Art Prize, Hobart at https://www.hadleysartprize.com.au/.

2019 Catalogue

The catalogue for the 2019 Hadley's Art Prize Hobart is available to download here.

Hadley Art Prize Hobart 20192019 Education Kit

This Hadley's Art Prize, Hobart Education Kit has been designed for use by students visiting the 2019 Hadley’s Art Prize Hobart (HAPH) exhibition of finalists. It is intended to introduce students and teachers to the Hadley’s Art Prize, and enhance their understanding and enjoyment of the exhibition. The exhibition will introduce students to a range of contemporary Australian landscape artworks that reveal how identity and land are interlinked, and how artists express their relationships to place in Australia. The HAPH Education Kit has been developed by art education specialists in partnership with the HAPH curator, and is endorsed by Art Education Australia.

The HAPH Education Kit can be used by teachers to explore with their students the interrelated strands of Making and Responding in the Australian Curriculum – The Arts, as well as intended learning outcomes within the Tasmanian Assessment, Standards and Certification (TASC) courses Art Studio Practice and Art Theory and Criticism. Teachers are encouraged to contextualise this resource to their particular learning and teaching context.

The HAPH includes the work of artists who encounter landscape from diverse cultural perspectives, including works from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists. When exploring artworks that deal with culturally situated knowledge, stories and complexities, teachers should not do this in isolation. Wherever possible, and for authentic learning experiences, it is best practice to collaborate with people from the communities within the culture your students are learning about. In addition to this, and when collaboration cannot be achieved face to face or virtually, it is important for teachers to familiarise themselves with the protocols of the culture they are learning about.

A list of useful freely available and credible online resources and cultural protocol documents can be found in the References and Resources section on p. 55 of this education kit. Please refer to these resources before, during and after your explorations of artwork with students.

Download the 2019 Hadley's Art Prize, Hobart Education Kit here.

The touring exhibition of the 2018 Queensland Regional Art Award

Wanderlust Catalogue

Catalogue

From dirt roads to rock pools, luscious rainforests to local festivals, Queensland is a state that inspires exploration. It’s full of diverse personalities, local legends and hidden gems valued by tourists and locals alike. Artists were asked to embrace a spirit of adventure to discover something unique about their own community or another within the state.

The Wanderlust exhibition is an outcome of the 2018 Queensland Regional Art Awards.

The Queensland Regional Art Awards is Flying Arts' signature annual art awards for established and emerging artists living in regional and remote Queensland. The awards aim to highlight the wealth of creative talent located outside the capital city and provide a platform for professional development.

Award participants have their work featured in an online gallery, and are considered for the major prize. Participants can also enter several minor award categories and may also have their work selected for exhibition.

The touring exhibition of the Queensland Regional Art Awards travels to metropolitan and regional galleries in the year following the award.

Download the catalouge as a PDF.

Education Kit

The Wanderlust Education Kit has been designed by the University of Southern Queensland in collaboration with Flying Arts Alliance and Art Education Australia (AEA) to support teacher and student engagement with the touring exhibition of the 2019 Queensland Regional Art Awards titled Wanderlust.

Wanderlust Education KitThe activities outlined in this education kit are designed to introduce students and teachers to visual art centric learning opportunities associated with the Wanderlust touring exhibition. The activities outlined in the kit pay particular attention to the regional and remote impact of place on Queensland artists. When explored in conjunction with this education kit, the exhibition positions students to consider the complexities of place and its impact on our sense of identity.

Through the education kit students are encouraged to consider:

  • the impact of place on our identity;
  • how artists express and communicate ideas about relationships between place; and
  • how the arts foster resilience.

The Wanderlust Education Kit can be used by teachers to explore with their students the interrelated strands of Making and Responding in the Australian Curriculum – The Arts, focussing on the visual arts. Teachers are encouraged to contextualise this resource to their particular learning and teaching context.

The Wanderlust Education Kit has been designed to help teachers identify entry points for students from upper primary (grade 5/6) through to middle (grade 7/8) and upper secondary (grade 9/10) to consider a range of viewpoints and perspectives through the Wanderlust exhibition. The nature of questions threaded throughout the activities include questions for the teacher to consider, as well as questions for students to help guide their investigation and facilitate scaffolded inquiry.

Download the Education Kit as a PDF.

Dark Rituals CatalogueThe exhibition Dark Rituals, Magical Relics: from the little art spell book brings together the work of seven contemporary women artists from Australia, Canada and New Zealand who have explored the importance of ritual and its place in their practice. The seven artists are Amalie Atkins (Canada), Margaret Baguley (Australia), Beata Batorowicz (Australia), Linda Clark (Australia), Ellie Coleman (Australia), Lisa Reihana (New Zealand) and Susan Shantz (Canada).

Each of the artists explore a sense of the magic that exists in everyday life and in the process share their personal narratives through the artworks they have created. They seek to subvert dominant histories, such as patriarchy and other power structures, by focussing on everyday life rituals and in the process highlight the ordinary and make it special through this process.

This exhibition was initiated by artist and academic, Beata Batorowicz in collaboration with Megan Williams, Manager of USC Art Gallery.

Download a PDF of the Catalogue here.

Education Kit

Dark Rituals Education KitThis education kit has been designed for use by students visiting Dark Rituals, Magical Relics: from the little art spell book. It is intended to enhance the understanding and enjoyment of students and teachers attending the exhibition. The exhibition will introduce students to the work of seven contemporary women artists from Australia and abroad. The Education Kit has been developed by art education specialists and is endorsed by Art Education Australia (AEA), Flying Arts Alliance and the University of Southern Queensland (USQ).

In 2013 the Arts became a curriculum entitlement for all Australians. The Education Kit can be used by teachers to explore with their students the interrelated strands of Making and Responding in the Australian Curriculum – The Arts, as well as intended learning outcomes within the Queensland Senior Secondary Art Syllabus including Visual Art and Visual Arts in Practice. Teachers are encouraged to contextualise this resource to their particular learning and teaching context.

The Education Kit includes the work of seven contemporary women artists who have engaged with the themes of ritual in their practice and the dynamics of transformation and empowerment. The topic of ritual associated with Country is also very important to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists. When exploring artworks that deal with culturally situated knowledge, stories and complexities, teachers should not do this in isolation. Wherever possible, and for authentic learning experiences, it is best practice to collaborate with people from the communities within the culture your students are learning about. In addition to this, and when collaboration cannot be achieved face to face or virtually, it is important for teachers to familiarise themselves with the protocols of the culture they are learning about.

A list of useful freely available and credible online resources and cultural protocol documents can be found in the References and Resources section in this education kit.

Download a PDF of the Education Kit here.

on albatross islandThe ‘On Albatross Island’ Education Kit has been developed in collaboration with the Tasmanian Art Teachers Association (TATA). 

Please download and explore this kit in relation to the publicly accessible virtual exhibition of creative outputs curated into TATA’s online gallery here: https://tata.org.au/on-albatross-island/

You can also access (for 72 hour rent or purchase) Matthew Newton’s award winning documentary short film namanu rruni | Albatross Island, available to teachers for 72 hour rental via Vimeo for $9.99 (AUD) here: https://vimeo.com/ondemand/albatrossisland.

 

hadleys art prize cataloguePresented by Hadley’s Orient Hotel, the Hadley’s Art Prize, Hobart is an annual, acquisitive Australian landscape prize, which offers $100,000 to the winning entry. Dating back to 1834, Hadley’s Orient Hotel has a rich and fascinating history interwoven with art, particularly landscape art.

The Hadley’s Art Prize, Hobart seeks to contribute to the Tasmanian and Australian art scene, generating interest in cultural tourism and promoting the work of contemporary Australian landscape artists.

Judged by a panel of art specialists, the prize is open to Australian artists over the age of eighteen working in two-dimensional media. Artists at all career stages are invited to enter. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists are encouraged to enter.

Find out more about Hadley's Art Prize, Hobart at https://www.hadleysartprize.com.au/.

2018 Catalogue

The catalogue for the 2018 Hadley's Art Prize Hobart was generously made available as a PDF for Art Education Australia members.
Download a copy of the catalogue here.

If you would like to purchase a hard copy please visit https://www.hadleysartprize.com.au/product/2018-art-prize-catalogue/.

Hadleys Art Prize Hobart Education Kit2018 Education Kit

This Hadley's Art Prize, Hobart Education Kit was designed for use by students visiting the 2018 Hadley’s Art Prize Hobart (HAPH) exhibition of finalists. It was intended to introduce students and teachers to the Hadley’s Art Prize, and enhance their understanding and enjoyment of the exhibition. The exhibition introduced students to a range of contemporary Australian landscape artworks that revealed how identity and land are interlinked, and how artists express their relationships to place in Australia. The HAPH Education Kit was developed by art education specialists in partnership with the HAPH curator, and is endorsed by Art Education Australia.

The HAPH Education Kit can be used by teachers to explore with their students the interrelated strands of Making and Responding in the Australian Curriculum – The Arts, as well as intended learning outcomes within the Tasmanian Assessment, Standards and Certification (TASC) courses Art Studio Practice and Art Theory and Criticism. Teachers are encouraged to contextualise this resource to their particular learning and teaching context.

The HAPH includes the work of artists who encounter landscape from diverse cultural perspectives, including works from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists. When exploring artworks that deal with culturally situated knowledge, stories and complexities, teachers should not do this in isolation. Wherever possible, and for authentic learning experiences, it is best practice to collaborate with people from the communities within the culture your students are learning about. In addition to this, and when collaboration cannot be achieved face to face or virtually, it is important for teachers to familiarise themselves with the protocols of the culture they are learning about.

A list of useful freely available and credible online resources and cultural protocol documents can be found in the References and Resources section on p. 43 of this education kit. Please refer to these resources before, during and after your explorations of artwork with students.

Download the 2018 Hadley's Art Prize, Hobart Education Kit here.

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